Tag Archives: dairy

Man Made Milking Machine!

cow tongue

While filming on a farm in Limuru, Kenya for another episode of the new series, we came across one of the fastest milkers we had ever seen on our travels! The farmer, who owned over 30 cows and a massive 17,000 chickens, was clearly used to getting a lot of work done in a short amount of time.

Check his skills out in the video below and tell us if you think you could do better!

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Belle and her Baby!

Gracchus in his calf pen shortly after being born

Graccus in his calf pen shortly after being born

It is with so much excitement that Shamba Shape Up can announce that Belle, the resident Jersey cow, has had her calf! The boy, who has been named Graccus, was born on Saturday last week, quickly and easily to the first time mother. Belle is a pure bred Jersey cow belonging to series producer Anne Marie. Belle has been featured on the show’s social media sites as a way of connecting with our viewers, farmer to farmer, who are learning as we learn. Belle arrived on Anne Marie’s farm 3 months ago, already pregnant. It was her first pregnancy. We had hoped the calf would be a heifer, who in turn would also provide milk, however the bull calf will still provide Anne Marie with a good sale as a stud bull when he is weaned. It is well known in the dairy world that Jerseys are easy calvers, however no one expected Graccus’ arrival both to be so easy and so quick! He was born 1 week early, and within the space of twenty minutes! Anne Marie left Belle tied to a tree to collect some more water for her. On her return she was surprised to find the calf quietly lying on the ground in front of his mother!

Gracchus and Belle waited patiently for Anne Marie

Graccus and Belle waited patiently for Anne Marie

The calf will stay on Anne Marie’s farm with Belle until he is roughly 8 months old, after which he will be sold. He is already sampling early weaner pellets, and growing fast! Belle will continue to be milked, something she is a little unsure of (definitely not a fan – she broke her milking stall on the first attempt), and in around 3 months’ time, will be served with AI using Jersey bull semen.

Belle will wait until her second heat after the birth to be impregnated again via AI

Belle will wait until her second heat after the birth to be impregnated again via AI

However, until then, we are looking forward to seeing the baby grow and will keep you updated on his progress!

Africa’s Agriculture and Agribusiness Markets Set to Top US$ One Trillion in 2030 — World Bank Report

In a report by the World Bank, who awarded Shamba Shape Up it’s SecureNutrition Knowledge Platform’s 2013, has released a report stating that Africa’ has the potential to reach markets of over US$ one trillion by 2030.

http://www.worldbank.org/en/news/feature/2013/03/04/africa-agribusiness-report

Despite the massive amount that is stated, it is a figure that Shamba Shape Up thinks can be achieved after reading our recent research report from Reading University. The report stated that “The overall number of households specifically reporting that they had made changes to their maize or dairy practices as a result of the programme, or who reported that they had benefited from SSU through increased profit or improved household food situation, is statistically estimated to be 428,566. Households who reported making specific changes in their farming practices as a result of Shamba Shape Up are statistically estimated to be 218,562 households for maize and 65,063 for dairy. From these two enterprises, the statistically estimated net economic impact in the 25 counties was US$24,718,648; this comes mostly from dairy enterprises.”

This amazing statistic (and the method behind reaching it) can be found in the report on our website:

http://shambashapeup.com/static/uploads/READING_RESEARCH.pdf

In layman’s terms, this means that statistically, due to the data collected and scaled up to the population of (mainly) dairy farmers in Kenya, the changes made by farmers who watch the show, led to an increase of US$24,718,648 to the value of the milk produced within the country.

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Assessing the Impact of Shamba Shape Up: Research by Reading University and AECF

The report, which was commissioned by Reading University in the UK, and was carried out by Africa Enterprise Challenge Fund (AECF), focuses on the changes brought about on the farms of viewers of Shamba Shape Up’s last 4 series.

AECF commissioned a study to investigate the impact of the Shamba Shape Up TV edu-tainment programme on small-scale agriculture in Kenya and to research the processes by which the programme influences farmers’ activities. The assessment is based on a theory of change that draws on three bodies of theory and research which have informed the design of the Shamba Shape Up initiative: mass media and society; agricultural and rural extension; and innovation systems.

The report was made up from the answers given by the 14,000 interviewees, and goes into details about the specifics of where change has been made in relation to the information gained from watching the show. The area of study most focused on was the south-west of Kenya, known to be the most fruitful area for agriculture.

Map of interviewed

Shamba Shape Up covers a range of enterprises. This assessment focussed mainly on maize and dairy as they were the most focused on. In both enterprises, viewers of the programme were significantly more likely to have made changes in practice featured in broadcasts, and to have made more changes, than non-viewers, even when other socio-economic variables are taken into account.

The overall number of households specifically reporting that they had made changes to their maize or dairy practices as a result of the programme, or who reported that they had benefited from SSU through increased profit or improved household food situation, is statistically estimated to be 428,566.

Households who reported making specific changes in their farming practices as a result of Shamba Shape Up are statistically estimated to be 218,562 households for maize and 65,063 for dairy. From these two enterprises, the statistically estimated net economic impact in the 25 counties was US$24,718,648; this comes mostly from dairy enterprises.

To read the full report, or a condensed version, please visit the ‘Research’ section of our website:

http://shambashapeup.com/research