Tag Archives: Reading University

A reality TV show with real impacts on farms

Filming Series 4

CCAFS have written a report highlighting the work Shamba Shape Up does and the results we are getting. For CCAFS, it’s an ideal opportunity to scale up communication and turn knowledge into action. Scientists involved in climate-smart agriculture research across CGIAR help develop the show’s content and are regularly featured in episodes.

CCAFS have measured impact by looking at our Facebook page, our Twitter, this blog, the leaflets and our most recent research which was led by AECF.

To read what CCAFS wrote, please have a look on their blog here or at the more general report here.

Africa’s Agriculture and Agribusiness Markets Set to Top US$ One Trillion in 2030 — World Bank Report

In a report by the World Bank, who awarded Shamba Shape Up it’s SecureNutrition Knowledge Platform’s 2013, has released a report stating that Africa’ has the potential to reach markets of over US$ one trillion by 2030.

http://www.worldbank.org/en/news/feature/2013/03/04/africa-agribusiness-report

Despite the massive amount that is stated, it is a figure that Shamba Shape Up thinks can be achieved after reading our recent research report from Reading University. The report stated that “The overall number of households specifically reporting that they had made changes to their maize or dairy practices as a result of the programme, or who reported that they had benefited from SSU through increased profit or improved household food situation, is statistically estimated to be 428,566. Households who reported making specific changes in their farming practices as a result of Shamba Shape Up are statistically estimated to be 218,562 households for maize and 65,063 for dairy. From these two enterprises, the statistically estimated net economic impact in the 25 counties was US$24,718,648; this comes mostly from dairy enterprises.”

This amazing statistic (and the method behind reaching it) can be found in the report on our website:

http://shambashapeup.com/static/uploads/READING_RESEARCH.pdf

In layman’s terms, this means that statistically, due to the data collected and scaled up to the population of (mainly) dairy farmers in Kenya, the changes made by farmers who watch the show, led to an increase of US$24,718,648 to the value of the milk produced within the country.

Screen Shot 2014-11-25 at 1.15.03 PM

Assessing the Impact of Shamba Shape Up: Research by Reading University and AECF

The report, which was commissioned by Reading University in the UK, and was carried out by Africa Enterprise Challenge Fund (AECF), focuses on the changes brought about on the farms of viewers of Shamba Shape Up’s last 4 series.

AECF commissioned a study to investigate the impact of the Shamba Shape Up TV edu-tainment programme on small-scale agriculture in Kenya and to research the processes by which the programme influences farmers’ activities. The assessment is based on a theory of change that draws on three bodies of theory and research which have informed the design of the Shamba Shape Up initiative: mass media and society; agricultural and rural extension; and innovation systems.

The report was made up from the answers given by the 14,000 interviewees, and goes into details about the specifics of where change has been made in relation to the information gained from watching the show. The area of study most focused on was the south-west of Kenya, known to be the most fruitful area for agriculture.

Map of interviewed

Shamba Shape Up covers a range of enterprises. This assessment focussed mainly on maize and dairy as they were the most focused on. In both enterprises, viewers of the programme were significantly more likely to have made changes in practice featured in broadcasts, and to have made more changes, than non-viewers, even when other socio-economic variables are taken into account.

The overall number of households specifically reporting that they had made changes to their maize or dairy practices as a result of the programme, or who reported that they had benefited from SSU through increased profit or improved household food situation, is statistically estimated to be 428,566.

Households who reported making specific changes in their farming practices as a result of Shamba Shape Up are statistically estimated to be 218,562 households for maize and 65,063 for dairy. From these two enterprises, the statistically estimated net economic impact in the 25 counties was US$24,718,648; this comes mostly from dairy enterprises.

To read the full report, or a condensed version, please visit the ‘Research’ section of our website:

http://shambashapeup.com/research